carl-swanson

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    carl-swanson on · in reply to: Harp teacher survey #221344

    I did that several times. It just takes me to a google page that lists surveymonkey.


    Participant
    carl-swanson on · in reply to: Harp teacher survey #221342

    I’ve copied and pasted the above address twice and it takes me to the home page of surveymonkey. What am I suppose to do then?


    Participant
    carl-swanson on · in reply to: Unusual Harp Harmonic Notation #220165

    I suspect that this composer read about Salzedo’s method of writing harmonics where they sound, and not where you play them. If that’s the case, then you would roll the chord and the left hand would quickly replay the note an octave lower than the harmonic note, as a harmonic. If that is the intended way of playing the chords that end in a harmonic note, then I think I would play the lowest note in the chord with the left hand, the next three with the right hand, and the harmonic(an octave lower than written) with the left hand.


    Participant
    carl-swanson on · in reply to: Playing w thumb collapse #219707

    Jennifer- So sorry to hear about this. How do your other fingers function? What level are you used to playing at? Maybe you could try refingering what you play using only 2,3, and 4. Reinhart Elster, who was the principal harpist at the Metropolitan Opera for many many years, had arthritis in his fingers towards the end of his long career. He managed to continue playing by changing fingerings. I think by the time he retired, he wasn’t using much more than his two index fingers! The great American pianist Byron Janis had the same problem and had to refinger everything he played, but continued to play in public.


    Participant
    carl-swanson on · in reply to: Angelus – Renie #219592

    Gretchen- I’m entirely in agreement with you. I have no idea what Jennifer is offended about.


    Participant
    carl-swanson on · in reply to: Rivets seizing on pedals #219575

    All of the 20th century harp companies(Lyon & Healy, Wurlitzer, Venus, etc.) used bronze rivets to hold the brass pedal to the steel pedal bar. Over time, and lots of folding and unfolding the pedals, that joint either becomes so tight that it can’t be moved, or so loose that the pedal will not stay folded up. Most companies now use a bolt and nut specially made for that joint that can be adjusted for tightness. Whenever I have to replace those bronze rivets, I drill the old rivet out, smear the hole with graphite grease, and then install a bolt and nut. It works beautifully and can be adjusted from time to time if needed to make it tighter or looser.


    Participant
    carl-swanson on · in reply to: Angelus – Renie #219118

    Balfour- You’re right. Angelus was rung three times a day. But for centuries, workers worked a 12 hour day, which started at 6 in the morning and went until 6 at night. So the Angelus ringing of the bells marked the beginning and end of the work day for most people. I think the peasants in the Millet painting are thanking God that the work day is finally over!


    Participant
    carl-swanson on · in reply to: Which exercises to pick? #219039

    You might try my book, BOCHSA REVISITED, which is an updating of short 19th century etudes. They’re fun to play, and drill one aspect of technique at a time. They sound like real pieces and are not just repetitive exercises. The edition is published by Carl Fischer Music and is available at a lot of harp stores. It’s also available on my web site, http://www.swansonharp.com.


    Participant

    There’s a piece by Daniel Pinkham called COMPANY AT THE CRESCHE(SP?) which is scored for three part treble voices, handbells, and harp. The harp part could be doubled or divided up between 2 players. It consists of 6 or 7 short movements. If you don’t have handbells, it could be played on glockenspiel or celeste. The publisher would be E.C. Schirmer.


    Participant
    carl-swanson on · in reply to: Wurlitzer at Estate Sale #218515

    Paul is right, the harp was extensively rebuilt, and most likely the wings were put on at that time. The harp is a small instrument, 44 or 45 strings probably. The decal on the soundboard and the 4 feet are all by Venus. So my guess is that Venus bought the instrument, rebuilt it, and sold it to the current owners. If you are thinking seriously of buying it, I would have a qualified technician look it over to make sure it is in good structural condition. If the harp is in good useable condition, and if you like the sound and want to buy it, in today’s (depressed) market, the value of this harp would be somewhere between $9,000 and $12,000.


    Participant
    carl-swanson on · in reply to: balls on the soundboard #218468

    Catherine- Just an added comment. The ones on very old harps were meant to look like ivory. They were never ivory, but were made of cellulose, a 19th century form of plastic. Cellulose was also used to make dice and billiard balls, among other things. The problem with it is that it is very unstable and deteriorates over time(a long time). So those “ivory pegs” and the old eyelets should never be reused when replacing the soundboard.


    Participant
    carl-swanson on · in reply to: Strings on an Érard Empire #217800

    Orian- What country are you in? it must be someplace in Europe. I would suggest you contact one of the harp repair shops, particularly in England, and see what they recommend. Pilgrim Harps and Allan Harbour are two who come to mind. In Paris I would contact Le MAGASIN DE LA HARPE. They are all used to dealing with Erard harps, most of which are very old now. So special care has to be taken. It would be even better if you could take the harp to one of these places so they could examine it.


    Participant
    carl-swanson on · in reply to: Opinion on a harp part #217585

    Yuk! What an awful looking part!! It will take a lot of work to rewrite this so that 1) the notes are spelled the way they have to be played on the harp, and 2) the notes are written showing which hand plays what. You should be paid for this. If whoever hired you squaks, tell them that you’re not charging them for practicing the piece, but rather for the necessary editing that the composer should have had done before the piece was published.


    Participant
    carl-swanson on · in reply to: Low C String #217185

    The only reason I can think of for extending the length of the soundboard would be to have some resonating area available for the last notes at either end of the board, i.e., C7 and G00. Why not add one string at the bottom(B7) and one string at the top(A00). Neither string would actually be played, but their presence would add more resonating soundboard above and below the two strings that would occasionally be played(C7 and G00).


    Participant
    carl-swanson on · in reply to: Low C String #217056

    7th octave C and D, which are the strings you are talking about, sit right on top of the main action, which is the three gears behind the front action plate, and which take the movement from the pedal rods and divide it between the natural and sharp chains. There is just no room to put linkage and discs for those two strings. But there really is another reason as well. Those last 5 strings on the instrument(6th octave G and F, and 7th octave E,D, and C) have quite a wide swing to them when they are played. They are capable of banging into the prongs of the sharp disc when in flat position, and capable of banging into each other if they are pulled too hard. I think that discs on those last two strings would have horrible problems with the strings banging the sharp disc prongs.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 2,137 total)