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Suggestion needed for Hebrew or Jewish melody

  • Sherry
    Sherry Lenox

    Could anyone suggest a phrase of melody from Jewish ritual practice or culture that would immediately suggest grief or tragedy to the informed listener?


    Thank you!

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    replies to "Suggestion needed for Hebrew or Jewish melody"
    • Saul
      Saul Davis Zlatkovski

      Avinu Malkenu

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    • Faye
      Faye Fishman

      Hi

      I disagree with Avinu Malkenu. That's "Our Father Our KIng" and is for the Sabbath Service and daily service. It's not associated with grief and tragedy.

      Kol Nidre which sounds austere is supposed to be awe inspiring. So not that either.

      Not sure what would be grief and tragedy, usually, there is an absence of music with grief and tragedy.

      Maybe ask a local Rabbi or Cantor.

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    • Faye
      Faye Fishman

      Hi again,

      Happened to see the Rabbi and asked. Avenu Malkenu and Kol nidre definitely not associated with tragedy or loss.

      Jewish litturgical music is almost all devotional and celebratory. Only possiblity is music played during Yizkor service and ask a Cantor for those.

      Hope that helps.

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    • Andee
      Andee Craig

      Asking a rabbi or cantor is definitely your best bet, but music from 'Fiddler on the Roof' qualify? 'Sunrise, Sunset' isn't tragic, but it is bittersweet....

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    • Sherry
      Sherry Lenox

      I truly appreciate the comments. They have been both helpful and enlightening. Also, the choral version of "Avinu Malkenu" on YouTube is beautifully done.


      I have realized that what I am actually needing is a phrase that could be chanted or spoken. The music is to memorialize the loss of a group of victims of a disaster, Jewish and Christian young people together during an unexpected catastrophic event. I originally considered using a fragment of familiar music, but now I have decided to use music that I have written if I can find meaningful phrases to honor the two traditions.


      The music has already been composed, and will accomodate a short phrase. Is there a line or statement from the prayer that accompanies the lighting of the Memorial Candle that might work?


      Thank you once again for responding to my request. The project I have undertaken is dear to my heart, and I am eager to honor the unfortunate young people appropriately.

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    • Saul
      Saul Davis Zlatkovski

      You definitely need the advice of a cantor, or other expert on Jewish music. I chose Avinu Malkenu because it is deeply moving, and beseeching. Eili, Eili has deep associations for people. Really, it sounds like you want the mourner's Kaddish. There are also songs, not liturgical music that might have the desired effect, and the contrast of something uplifting might be right. Ani Maamin was composed on the trains to the death camps. Etz Chaim is another song of faith.

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    • Patricia
      Patricia Jaeger

      Hebrew Melody, composed by Joseph Achron and transcribed by the late violinist Efrem Zimbalist for violin with piano accompaniment, is very sad. The dedication is "To the memory of my Father". Two directions at the beginning are Tranquillissimo dolente (very calm and grieving) and 'con suono pieno e piangendo' (with a sound full of weeping). It may be that by a search you would find the original to be for piano, or orchestra, etc. My copy years ago was 60 cents from G. Schirmer Inc., New York.

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    • Faye
      Faye Fishman

      Sunrise Sunset is very beautiful but often sung at weddings at many times used as a dance for bride and father. That might be too hard for a parent to listen to at a memorial service; Even psalms would need to be appropriate, for ex. Dodi li is for weddings. Asking a cantor would be your best bet for something like this.

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